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They Fight With Cameras: Walter Rosenblum in World War II From D-Day to Dachau

group of young man in army dress holding cameras in a hill
They fight with cameras
Photograph by Walter Rosenblum
Normandy, France
June 27, 1944

So that all the world might have a photographic record of the invasion, these men, Signal Corps combat photographers, risk their lives on the front — their only weapons, a camera and a lot of nerve.

Collection of Rosenblum Photography Archive

August 26 – December 16, 2015

When the United States entered into World War II, it was with a sense of moral duty that many men entered the fight; Walter Rosenblum (1919-2006) was one of them. As a U.S. Army combat photographer Rosenblum landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day, then traveled throughout Europe with various combat units. Documenting the war under extremely dangerous conditions, he secured the surrender of 75 German troops, was wounded in combat, and took some of the first motion picture footage of the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp. Rosenblum was one of the most decorated WWII photographers, awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, five battle stars, the Purple Heart, and a Presidential Unit Citation.

Curated by Manuela Fugenzi, produced by Studio Zizola, Rome, and Daedalus Productions, Inc., New York.

Army medics evacuating a casualty
Photograph by Walter Rosenblum
St. Lo, France
July 20, 1944

Collection of Rosenblum Photography Archive
 
Omaha Beach rescue
Photograph by Walter Rosenblum
Normandy, France
June 7, 1944
 
Collection of Rosenblum Photography Archive
old id card, war photograph pass
War Photographers Press Pass of Walter Rosenblum
January 19, 1945

Collection of Rosenblum Photography Archive

Public Programs

12:00 noon
Film Screening
Walter Rosenblum: In Search of Pitt Street


6:00 p.m.
Talk
Nina Rosenblum

Film Producer, Daedalus Productions, Inc.


Installation Views

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